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Did you vaccinate against calf scours for this season?
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October 31, 2014
LATEST NEWS
IOWA PREMIUM BEEF AT TAMA TO BEGIN OPERATION

Iowa Premium Beef (IPB) will begin processing cattle at its Tama plant by the end of the month. The plant will begin processing 1,100 cattle per day with a maximum potential of more than 2,000 head. The plant will purchase high quality Black Angus cattle raised on family farms within 150 miles of Tama. $40 million has been spent on the 200,000-square foot plant. Improvements include a new welfare facility for the harvest floor, a new hot-carcass cooler, new refrigerated distribution center and new wastewater treatment facility.
RIO ARRIBA COUNTY EXTENSION TO HOST BEEF EMPORIUM

4-H and FFA members will have an opportunity to purchase a calf at the Top of the River Prospective Beef Emporium on Sunday, November 2, at the Rio Arriba County Fairgrounds in Abiquiu, New Mexico. New Mexico State University’s Rio Arriba County Cooperative Extension Service has organized the event to give producers an opportunity to network with 4-H and FFA members interested in market beef and cattle breeding projects. For more information contact marctala@nmsu.edu or call 575-588-7423 or 505-685-4523.
PASTURE-RANGE CONDITIONS CONTINUE POSITIVE

According to the Livestock Marketing Information Center (LMIC), pasture and range conditions as of mid-October were the best since 1996. Since June, the Great Plains, Southern Plains and Corn Belt regions have experienced much smaller percentages of very poor and poor pasture acres this year compared to 2013 and the five-year average. The Western Region has been tracking around 35% of pasture land categorized as very poor and poor, up from a seasonal five-year average of just under 25%.
WORKING RANCH BLOGOSPHERE
Leann Martin Plan D
April 24, 2014
ARTICLES
Pick Your PVP

Process Verified Program, that is

- by Merridee Wells

- Photo by Sage Pool


Process Verified Programs, or PVP’s as they are commonly called, are another of the many new-fangled phrases which are becoming commonplace in our cattle industry today. Breed associations draw them like a gun while marketing programs dazzle you with their PVP requirements and the auction companies brag on their value-added benefits.


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Prep For the Cold

Make sure your cows are nutritionally ready


- by Gilda V. Bryant

- photo by Lucie Wiese



























Minerals are important for herd health, reproduction and efficiency during winter.  However, that is only part of the picture.  Extra protein and energy are vital during cold, wet weather.  Producers should also be aware of forage and by-product supplementation quality, as well as body condition scores. 



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An Ounce of Prevention
- by Dr. Arn Anderson, DVM





















A drive through the unloading pen with seven-foot tall pipe fence, double gates with two latches and two chains, a trained technician and a seven-foot perimeter fence; this litany of security measures clicked off in my brain as I ran toward my truck instinctively yelling “loose bull!”.  Only moments before, 747, a dog-gentle 2200 lb, five year-old Limousin bull, had calmly walked off the trailer and into the large animal hospital.  He had come for an exam to determine the cause of his lethargy and malaise. 



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Battle the Bad Bacteria

Your secret weapon? Ionophores

by Melissa Albertson

photo by Malloree Barnes

As you consider all the different products available to help increase the performance for your herd, you can’t ignore the proven benefits of feeding ionophores: improved feed utilization, increased gain, prevention and control of coccidiosis, and cost effectiveness. Even so, while ionophore use is extremely common in feedlot finishing diets, they still are an underutilized product in grazing operations.


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The Sky’s the Limit
 Controlling High Altitude Sickness

by Merridee Wells

Photo by Tayler Teichert


For all you flatlanders who have taken a vacation to the mountains, if you felt drowsy, lethargic or had shortness of breath, you may have experienced some of the same symptoms that cattle do when they graze in elevations above 5,000 feet.  The bovine condition, known among ranchers as high altitude sickness or brisket disease, can eventually lead to congestive heart failure in affected animals. 


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A Bigger Hammer - Ask and Ye Shall Receive
 
 by Dr. Arn Anderson, DVM

 

With all this snow in North Texas it’s difficult to realize that spring calving season is here.  In our cow-calf herds this can be a labor intensive time, particularly with first-calf heifers.  The secret to a successful season involves planning. 

Sam had followed all the rules.  He had bred his heifers early to a low birthweight bull and fed them well.  Sam had the cattle calving within easy reach of a good set of pens with a wind break and a covered working chute.  He had access to water, electricity and lights.  In the shed was a tool box with all the equipment he would need to deliver and, if needed, revive a calf.  Sam had also attended a couple of extension service classes on when to call his vet.  He was confident in his experience and skill. 


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