WR WEEKLY NEWS

U.S. HOUSE VOTED TO REPEAL COOL

 

Last Wednesday, the U.S. House voted 300-131 to repeal the mandatory country of origin labeling (COOL) law for beef, pork and poultry.  This vote followed the fourth ruling against the U.S. law by the World Trade Organization.  It is an attempt to keep Canada and Mexico from implementing tariffs on U.S. products.  Action by the Senate is  still needed.

HOME ON THE DESERT SUITS THESE CATTLE

 

The Criollo herd at the USDA’s Jornada Experimental Range, outside of Las Cruces, New Mexico, may be descendants of cattle brought to the New World by Spanish conquistadors 500 years ago.  Scientists are studying whether these 500 Criollo cattle, handpicked from the Mexican state of Chihuahua, may be better suited to prolonged drought.  Smaller than Angus and Herefords, Criollo are able to roam a greater distance without water and eat more diverse forage.

CATTLE FOUNDATION OUTLINES PRIORITIES AND FUNDRAISING

 

The Canadian Cattlemen’s Foundation, is now a charitable foundation established to support conservation practices, leadership development and beef industry sustainability.  There is widespread support for the Cattlemen’s Young Leaders program, which will build leaders in the cattle industry.  The program needs a long-term funding strategy in place to support it for years to come.  For more information, visit www.cattle.ca/assets/Foundation/FAQ.pdf.

BEEF CATTLE FIELD DAY SET FOR MOUNTAIN RESEARCH STATION

The North Carolina State University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, the N.C. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and the N.C. Cattlemen’s Association will sponsor North Carolina’s annual Beef Cattle Field Day on July 18.  This event will be held at the Mountain Research Station in Waynesville and will present programs on forage management, reproduction and nutrition.   For more information call Dr. Philipe Moriel (828)456-3943 Extension 229 or email him at pmoriel@ncsu.edu.

MONITOR TICK INFESTATION IN CATTLE

Tick populations are exploding in Oklahoma thanks to cool temperatures, high humidity and above-normal rainfall.  Ticks can carry various diseases that are detrimental to cattle, other livestock, household pets and people.  It’s important for producers to check for ticks on cattle, and initiate control measures to limit disease and/or loss of performance.  Ticks are usually found in the ears of cattle.  Check with local extension agents for more information on tick control.

USDA Grant Received By Center For Outcomes Research And Education

A research team from Kansas State University will study risk management strategies to help reduce the health and economic effects of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in commercial feeder cattle.  The USDA awarded a $489,466  grant to the university’s Center for Outcomes Research and Education Center.   BRD is the most common cause of sickness and death in U.S. feeder cattle, costing the U.S. beef industry some $4 billion yearly. The long term goal of the study is to reduce the health and economic impacts of BRD and to improve disease management.

Cattle Stockmanship and BQA Workshops Coming To Western Nebraska

Nebraska Extension and Nebraska Beef Quality Assurance are presenting two cattle handling demonstrations June 22 in Mitchell and June 23 in Valentine by animal handling expert Curt Pate. Pate will present low-stress handling demonstrations. Improved handling alleviates unnecessary stress to the animal and allows the producer to move cattle more efficiently and effectively. The BQA training will be presented by Rob Eirich, Nebraska Director of BQA. For more information call 308-632-1230 or email reirich2@unl.edu.

Local Beef Deal To Benefit University of Kentucky Diners

An agreement between two Kentucky processors and a large food distributor is opening up a much-needed market for Appalachian beef cattle. Most of the cattle raised in the state are sent to the Great Plains for finishing. The University of Kentucky will partner with The Chop Shop, Omni Custom Meats, Inc., and Sysco to provide Kentucky beef for the students at UK and other customers in the state.

Herd Expansion To Benefit From Drenching Rains

By: Gilda V. Bryant

Drenching rains that recently soaked the Great Plains are greening pastures as ranchers begin to move cattle to grazing lands. Ranchers in drought-stricken areas are trying to rebuild herds that were decimated in the 2011, 2012 and 2013 droughts. In the past month, ranchers have benefited from generous rainfall, which has greatly improved range and pasture conditions. Experts say beef cow herds will expand as planned.